Adam Eldridge

Adam Eldridge

Senior Lecturer

Adam Eldridge is a senior lecturer in Sociology at the University of Westminster, London. He is the co-author of ‘Planning the Night-time City’ with Marion Roberts and co-editor of ‘Exploring Nightlife: Space, Society and Governance’ with Jordi Nofre. His work examines the night in terms of leisure, work and gentrification.

Nightlife Tourism

ING Art Center - Right room
This paper examines the growth of nightlife tourism focusing on London, UK. While the impact of tourism on many international cities is widely recognised and debated (Venice or Barcelona, for example), the management of tourism in London, including at night, is less examined. What impact this is having on the city, especially in newly gentrifying areas, is discussed. However, the paper also questions whether London’s considerable size and diversity means tourism functions quite differently here at night to other smaller cities. Do the 20 million or so tourists who come to London annually simply blend in, or are they shaping how nightlife is lived and represented? And how do we count or recognise who is a tourist anyway? Drawing on the study of new urban tourism, the paper asks whether, in a city already full of strangers, nightlife offers us new ways of belonging and coming together while recognising the need to manage the already considerable impact of high tourism numbers on the city.
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Night explorers working group

Bip.Brussels - Brel
This paper examines the growth of nightlife tourism focusing on London, UK. While the impact of tourism on many international cities is widely recognised and debated (Venice or Barcelona, for example), the management of tourism in London, including at night, is less examined. What impact this is having on the city, especially in newly gentrifying areas, is discussed. However, the paper also questions whether London’s considerable size and diversity means tourism functions quite differently here at night to other smaller cities. Do the 20 million or so tourists who come to London annually simply blend in, or are they shaping how nightlife is lived and represented? And how do we count or recognise who is a tourist anyway? Drawing on the study of new urban tourism, the paper asks whether, in a city already full of strangers, nightlife offers us new ways of belonging and coming together while recognising the need to manage the already considerable impact of high tourism numbers on the city.
READ MORE