Anna Plyushteva

Anna Plyushteva

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Anna is an urban and transport geographer. She completed her PhD in 2016 (University College London). Anna’s research focuses on commuting, night-time mobility, public transport, and the intersections of different urban infrastructures. Her present project is about shift workers’ commutes in Brussels and Sofia

Night explorers working group

Bip.Brussels - Brel
The importance of the tourism and hospitality sectors to the urban night and the economies of cities has been well-documented. When discussing the transport needs of the night-time city, however, the focus is almost exclusively on tourism and hospitality establishments as spaces of consumption. A greater understanding of bars, hotels, restaurants and clubs as workplaces as well as leisure destinations can contribute to conceptualising night-time urban mobility in more diverse and inclusive terms. This contribution examines the challenges faced by tourism and hospitality workers who need to commute at night. Drawing on a mixed-method study of Sofia, Bulgaria, and Brussels, Belgium, I explore the barriers encountered and resources mobilised to make the nocturnal commute possible. The dimensions discussed include the need to continuously adjust one’s commute; the economic and non-economic costs of night commuting; cycling at night; and the impact of collegial and employer relations on negotiating the night commute.
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Night explorers

Bip.Brussels - Brel
The importance of the tourism and hospitality sectors to the urban night and the economies of cities has been well-documented. When discussing the transport needs of the night-time city, however, the focus is almost exclusively on tourism and hospitality establishments as spaces of consumption. A greater understanding of bars, hotels, restaurants and clubs as workplaces as well as leisure destinations can contribute to conceptualising night-time urban mobility in more diverse and inclusive terms. This contribution examines the challenges faced by tourism and hospitality workers who need to commute at night. Drawing on a mixed-method study of Sofia, Bulgaria, and Brussels, Belgium, I explore the barriers encountered and resources mobilised to make the nocturnal commute possible. The dimensions discussed include the need to continuously adjust one’s commute; the economic and non-economic costs of night commuting; cycling at night; and the impact of collegial and employer relations on negotiating the night commute.
READ MORE